Study finds Twitter increases traffic to medical websites

Study finds Twitter increases traffic to medical websites

Medscape Psychiatry posted “Twittering on About Mental Health: Is It Worth the Effort? ” on 2-21-17.  This article reviews some interesting research about use of Twitter to increase visits to a medical website, and has implications for potential professional use of social networking platforms.

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Online Mental Health Resources that Charge a Fee – Threat or Resource?

Online Mental Health Resources that Charge a Fee – Threat or Resource?

MHConcierge.com recently stumbled across two interesting websites that provide a wide range of resources for people interested in improving their mental health.  See Optimize with Brian Johnson and Open Forest. Both sites offer a wide variety of information about both specific mental health problems and general resources for improving, or even “optimizing” a person’s mental health functioning.

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Website SEO tips and video about how to chose technology resources

The website The Practice Academy posted “Why these 4 websites rank higher and attract more clients than yours” on 9-14-16. This article is a bit dense for those who are not savvy about website technology and search engine optomization concepts, but if you hand in there will will probably get some ideas of things you can to to increase the ranking of your website on browser searches.

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Virtual reality-enhanced assessment and therapy – two articles

Virtual reality-enhanced assessment and therapy – two articles

The American Psychological Association Journal Practice Innovations published “Virtual Reality for Psychological Assessment in Clinical Practice” in the September, 2016 issue.  The online blog PsyPost posted “Virtual Reality Training Improves Social Skills in People on the Autism Spectrum” on September 20, 2016.

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JAMA report: bad news for use of activity trackers for weight loss programs

JAMA report: bad news for use of activity trackers for weight loss programs

The Sept. 20, 2016 issue of JAMA includes, “Effect of Wearable Technology Combined With a Lifestyle Intervention on Long-term Weight Loss; The IDEA Randomized Clinical Trial.” This study compared weight loss programs using a standard protocol and an enhanced protocol using an activity tracker.  To cut to the chase, the authors conclude:

Among young adults with a BMI between 25 and less than 40, the addition of a wearable technology device to a standard behavioral intervention resulted in less weight loss over 24 months. Devices that monitor and provide feedback on physical activity may not offer an advantage over standard behavioral weight loss approaches.

mhconcierge.com’s take:  This study supports concerns that the benefits of activity trackers, at least for most people, have been overstated.  People who are highly motivated to improve their fitness seem to like them, and to benefit from them – but they are already probably on track with a wellness program and use their tracker to enhance what they are already doing. 

Chemical Dependency Treatment and Wristband Activity Sensors

Chemical Dependency Treatment and Wristband Activity Sensors

The online news service Medical News Today posted “Could wearable biosensors become part of drug rehab programs?” on 6-27-16.  The article reviews a recently published research study that found that wristband sensors provide helpful information about patients receiving opioid pain treatment in an ER.  The devices provided information about the patient’s response to the opioid medication in real time, and also could be used to track both medication compliance and treatment response in the community.

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