Not ready for prime time?  “Sleep biomarkers” and activity trackers to diagnose mental illness (Mayo Clinic is involved)

Not ready for prime time? “Sleep biomarkers” and activity trackers to diagnose mental illness (Mayo Clinic is involved)

StatNews.com posted This biotech aims to transform the diagnosis of mental illness. Michael Phelps backs it. Can it really work?  This article reports on an Australian company, Medibio, that claims to have developed an algorithm based on “hundreds” of sleep, hear rate and other biomarkers that can “reliably” be monitored using activity trackers – and that the resulting data can be used to diagnose mental illness. Remarkably , the Mayo Clinic has signed on to help Medibio review its diagnostic tools.

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Technology and Therapy: adding heart rate monitoring to video games helps kids with self regulation

Technology and Therapy: adding heart rate monitoring to video games helps kids with self regulation

“When Children Can Benefit From Playing Video Games” reports on the work by a group of researchers in Boston who have developed video games to help kids with anxiety, anger management problems and ADHD develop more effective self regulation.  Their games are similar to regular video games, but the child is hooked to a heart monitor, which increases the effectiveness of the training.

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A Bariatric Medical Society Weighs In On Twitter – and Recommends It To Clinicians

A Bariatric Medical Society Weighs In On Twitter – and Recommends It To Clinicians

The American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery published “Doctoring” in the Age of Social Media in the June, 2017, issue of the Society’s online journal ASMBS Connect. This article focuses on use of social media, particularly Twitter, by bariatric specialists, but the discussion is relevant for other clinicians.  It acknowledges that people interested in learning more about medical issues, such as obesity and weight loss issues, may be exposed to inaccurate or otherwise unhelpful information via social media.  On the other hand, it is, the article advocates, time to accept the fact that consumers of health care information are turning to social media, and clinicians who participate on social media have the opportunity to participate in online conversations about medical issues, and to “engage and support your patients.”

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