Study with over 33K subjects finds low-level exercise to be protective for depression, not anxiety

Study with over 33K subjects finds low-level exercise to be protective for depression, not anxiety

“Exercise and The Prevention of Depression: Results of the HUNT Cohort Study” was published by the American Journal of Psychiatry in the January 2018 issue. MHConcierge has reported frequently on studies like this, but this one is notable for a couple of reasons:

  • the study was a perspective study which followed 33,908 (!) adults for 11 years. The subjects were initially “healthy,” without current symptoms of depression or anxiety.
  • The study was designed to specifically research whether exercise provides protection against new-onset depression and anxiety, and if so what “dose” of exercise is required to gain protection.
  • The results find that regular leisure-time exercise was associated with reduced incidence of future depression, but not anxiety.
  • Perhaps most the most interesting finding is that at least one hour of physical activity per week was found to have a protective effect. And, “the majority of this protective effect occurred at low levels of exercise and observed regardless of intensity.”

MHConcierge’s take: this research builds on previous research about the mental health benefits of regular, but low-level, exercise. It supports the benefits of therapists asking their patients about their exercise/activity level, and helping them with a “doable” exercise/activity plan.

The abstract is available for free online. The full article is available online for $35.

Insomnia update: tart cherry juice found to have remarkable benefit (but from small study)

Insomnia update: tart cherry juice found to have remarkable benefit (but from small study)

Following up on last week’s posting about a sleep scientist’s advice opposing use of sleep medications, and advocating for naturalistic and psychological, here is another interesting article about research that finds that tart cherry do’s significantly increased sleep time for insomniacs. The ScienceBlog.com published “Montmorency Tart Cherry Juice Increased Sleep Time in Insomniacs” on 10-28-17.  The results were significant and found that the subjects who received the tart cherry juice treatment rated their sleep is significantly better, and were found to have actually slept on the average 84 more minutes than the control group.

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Mindfulness benefits for infants and children: you don’t need to be a Zen monk to help your child

Mindfulness benefits for infants and children: you don’t need to be a Zen monk to help your child

The New York Times posted “Mindfulness for Children” on 10-28-17. This is part of their ongoing Well blog series, which provides excellent summaries of recent research and developments of interest to the general population interested in health issues. This article reviews potential benefits of mindfulness training for children, including helping them learn self-control, soothe themselves when anxious, and can promote positive attitudes.

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Psychology and SUD treatment: BAT helps get better outcomes, sobriety

Psychology and SUD treatment: BAT helps get better outcomes, sobriety

On 10-26-17 the online blog ClinicalEdge, published by Clinical Psychiatry News, posted, “Behavioral Activation Effective for Substance Use.” This brief article reviews a study originally published online by the journal Addiction on 9-30-17. Researchers conducted a randomized clinical trial with 263 adult subjects, with follow-up assessment at three, six, and 12 months post treatment.

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Medical-CBT collaboration for IBS, home-based program better than regular CBT

Medical-CBT collaboration for IBS, home-based program better than regular CBT

The online blog MDEdge.com, published by Clinical PsychiatryNews, posted “Home-based Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy Aids IBS” on 10-19-17. This article reviews a thorough study with four 936 subjects who participated in a prospective, randomized comparison of a new home-based CBT therapy and to control groups, one of which was an educational IBS program and the other was standard CBT therapy. All groups participated in 10 weeks of intervention.

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Acceptance and Commitment Therapy More Effective Than CBT for Chronic Pain

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy More Effective Than CBT for Chronic Pain

“Acceptance And Commitment Therapy (ACT) for Chronic Pain” was published by the Clinical Journal of Pain in the June 2017 edition. This article reviews the challenges of treating chronic pain, evidence that CBT provides limited benefits, and evidence that ACT may be more effective than CBT.

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