Book Review: “Raising a Child on the Autism Spectrum: Insights from Parents to Parents”

Book Review: “Raising a Child on the Autism Spectrum: Insights from Parents to Parents”

Raising a Child on the Autism Spectrum: Insights From Parents to Parents,” by Mallory Griffith, MA, CCC-SLP and Rachel Bedard, PhD, TPI Press, 2017, 147 pp., $19.99.  MHConcierge’s take: compassionate stories for other parents, wise advice for clinicians and other professionals who serve, or even just have contact with, ASD children.

This book is a rich resource for parents, but should be required reading for medical, mental health, social work and academic professionals who provide services for ASD children.  I even highly recommend reading it if you are a clinician who just has contact with ASD, or potential ASD, children as they pass through your office, clinic, agency or school.  (more…)

Psychology in the public eye: Coffee table book about psych testing – weird, creepy and classics tests

Psychology in the public eye: Coffee table book about psych testing – weird, creepy and classics tests

Courtesy of the @info_Psicologos twitter feed, “The Beautiful Yet Twisted History of Psychological Testing” was published by Wired Magazine on 8-17-16. This article features pictures and commentary of some quaint tests, some scary tests, and even a few that are still in use, such as the Rorschach, based on a book that will be published soon, “Psychobook.”

(more…)

Book:  We all have “layers” of personality, expressed differently in different contexts

Book: We all have “layers” of personality, expressed differently in different contexts

Published by the Science of Us blog on 8-4-16, “So, You Probably Have 3 Selves” reviews a “fantastic” book by Cambridge University psychologist Brian Little, “My, Myself, and Us: The Science of Personality and the Art of Well-Being.’  Dr. Little asserts that we all have three layers of personality: biogenic (determined by our genes), sociogenic (learned from our family and culture) and idiogenic (personality traits that we choose to adapt based on what is important to us).  We express, according to Dr. Little, different degrees of each personality in different situations. He advocates that we do not have a certain personality “type,” but we have a collection of personality tendencies that form our unique identity.  The review is, as is typical for this blog, detailed and informative.

Book review: Berkeley psychologists studied creative geniuses in the ’50s, results are still be analyzed

Book review: Berkeley psychologists studied creative geniuses in the ’50s, results are still be analyzed

Design for Living” reports on a remarkable set of studies done by psychologists in the late ‘50s.  They studied outstanding leaders in four fields: literature, architecture, mathematics and physical science.  The article, published by the Wall Street Journal on 8-5-16, describes research done by a team at The Institute of Personality Assessment and Research that could never be done today: the team consulted experts in each of the four fields, such as professors and magazine editors, to identify national leaders in each field, asked them to participate and many  highly regarded experts agreed to join the study, flew the participants to Berkeley, had them participate in both intensive individual assessments and group discussions over several days, and studied the resulting data. They found that most of the subjects were highly independent thinkers, often had “psychiatric turbulence,” expressed as “a healthy form of restlessness,” and were rebellious in the field of study but not necessarily in social relationships.

Book review: “How We Built Our Dream Practice: Innovative Ideas for Building Yours.”

Book review: “How We Built Our Dream Practice: Innovative Ideas for Building Yours.”

imagesHow We Built Our Dream Practice: Innovative Ideas for Building Yours, by Dave Verhaagen, Ph.D., and Frank Gaskill, Ph.D., TPI Press, 2014.

Providing mental health services (therapy, testing, consultation-liaison services, and more) is increasingly challenging and stressful. Mental health professionals (MHPs) face pressures from Managed Care Organizations, expectations to be part of Accountable Care Organizations, competition from MPHs with less training, and more. Those of us in independent practice (individual or small group settings – not employed by someone else) are finding it increasingly difficult to survive – to say nothing about trying to thrive in our chosen field.   This book will challenge your assumptions about what you need to do to survive- and thrive- in the era of health care reform. 

(more…)

Critique of marital self help books, with “4 truths” that do help.

Critique of marital self help books, with “4 truths” that do help.

The Wall Street Journal published “Marital Disputes: A Survival Guide.  Quarreling with a spouse is inevitable, but a few truths can limit the fallout,” on 7-1-16.  The author discusses typical marital self-help books, finds them to generally be lacking, but also that there are some themes that come up over and over that may be helpful.  He distills the helpful information down to 4 “truths” – which do seem pragmatic and worth passing on to people struggling with relationship problems or wanting to improve their relationship skills.